Archive for January, 2013

Why Don’t They Apply What They’ve Learned, Part I – Do Your Job Better – The Chronicle of Higher Education

See on Scoop.itThe teaching professional

Getting students to transfer knowledge from one context to another is a much more complicated process than many of us expect.

Judith Morais‘s insight:

The article offers two possible reasons for this problem. Firstly, the learning may be too closely associated to the context it was learnt in. Secondly, the learning may be too shallow. The writer promises to look at stategies that can be used to develop the necessary habit of mind for transfering learning. Will have to look at the next installment for that.

See on chronicle.com

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MyRead – Home

See on Scoop.itThe reading skill

Strategies for teaching reading to children in the middle years

Judith Morais‘s insight:

A useful resource of theory and ideas in the website of the Australian Department of Education, Science and Training.

See on www.myread.org

NCTE Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children

See on Scoop.itThe reading skill

NCTE Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children

See on www.ncte.org

A gentle reminder as we begin the new year.

Click ont this link to see the comic strip from gocomic.com The difference between teaching and learning.

As  the new year begins, its timely to remember the difference between teaching and learning. Here are some of the things I’m doing to address this awareness as I prepare to teach in the new year. I’ll just address their listening skills here. So much of what happens within the classroom hinges on listening – whether the student is viewing a video or listening to the teacher or classmate. We all know how difficult it is to listen to a speech and catch the nuance of everything that is said. How much more difficult is it for students who may not be as motivated to listen 100 percent of the time. Help students learn by

– writing up key words on the whiteboard.

– reinforcing the learning in various ways such as game cards, mindmaps etc of your topic.

– teach students to make notes.

– get them to repeat parts of the lesson to their group. This ties in well with my needs as I expect my esl learners to speak at every lesson. One simple way to address this is to make them reteach a concept or a question to their group.

– Present reflection sheets through which you as a teacher can look at what your students have taken from your lesson.

 

Gates Foundation study: We’ve figured out what makes a good teacher

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A three-year, $45 million study of 3,000 teachers turns up answers to a central question.

Judith Morais‘s insight:

I agree with many of the ideas brought forth in this article.

1. That teachers need to be supervised by a competent range of people who can develop their skills further.

2. Test scores cannot be used without recognising what the teacher has inherited and how the teacher has moved the students along the continuum.

3. Student evaluations can be tricky. When students recognise the power that they can have by choosing what they say or not say, we need discerning individuals in administration who can see through to the truth. I’ve seen too many mistakes in this area in my experience.

See on www.washingtonpost.com

Shanahan on Literacy: Willful Ignorance and the Informational Text Controversy

See on Scoop.itThe reading skill

Judith Morais‘s insight:

Professor Shanahan explores how the teaching of  fiction and nonfiction texts can be integrated into the student’s school day. Some interesting ideas:

a. We need to look at how students learn to think. These skills are not developed just through the reading of fiction. For many students, the skills must be taught. And since learning theories have demonstrated that students have issues with transferring their learning, these skills must be taught via various avenues. Developing these skills through the use of non fiction as well as fiction texts will provide students with a wide range of learning experiences.

b. A breakdown to how the use of fiction and nonfiction texts is provided in one of the comments made to the article. The next question that needs exploring is how teachers of content subjects can effectively develop their students literacy during these hours while covering content. Personally I see it as no issue since students read (and write) to explore the development of their own learning in all subjects. The question is whether students are being taught how to read and write for their subjects.

 

See on www.shanahanonliteracy.com